San Diego | Chula Vista | Oceanside | Carlsbad
hollingsworth logo full one

The Differences Between SSI and SSDI Benefits: What You Need to Know?

SSI and SSDI benefits | 2H Law

The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers two different types of benefits programs – Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). Both programs provide financial assistance to disabled individuals, but there are some critical differences between the two.

All workers paid into the system for a certain period are eligible for benefits. SSI is a need-based program, meaning only applicants with limited financial resources are qualified for benefits. SSDI, on the other hand, is a federally mandated insurance program funded by payroll taxes.

Read on to learn more about the differences between SSI and SSDI benefits!

What are SSI and SSDI?

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are two programs that provide financial assistance to people with disabilities.

SSDI is a program funded by payroll taxes and provides benefits to workers unable to work due to a disability.

SSI is a needs-based program that benefits low-income individuals unable to work due to a disability.

SSI and SSDI benefits programs have strict eligibility requirements, and applicants must undergo a lengthy application process. However, these programs can provide much-needed financial assistance for those who qualify.

What are the differences between SSI and SSDI Benefits?

There are several critical differences between SSI and SSDI.

First, SSI is a needs-based program, meaning only applicants with limited financial resources are eligible for benefits. SSDI, on the other hand, is a federally mandated insurance program funded by payroll taxes. All workers paid into the system for a certain period are eligible for benefits.

Second, SSI benefits are paid out of general tax revenue, while SSDI benefits are paid out of the Social Security trust fund.

Third, SSI benefits are taxable income, while SSDI benefits are not.

Fourth, SSI benefits are paid monthly, while SSDI benefits are paid twice per month.

Finally, there are different rules for how benefits are paid if the recipient is married. If a recipient of SSI is married, their spouse’s income will be considered when determining eligibility for benefits. However, if a recipient of SSDI is married, their spouse’s income will not be considered.

Who is eligible for each type of benefit?

To be eligible for SSDI, applicants must have worked for a certain number of years and must have paid into the Social Security system. Applicants must also have a medical condition that meets the Social Security Administration’s definition of a disability.

Applicants must have a low income and few assets to be eligible for SSI. Applicants must also have a medical condition that meets the Social Security Administration’s definition of a disability.

It’s important to note that not all disabilities qualify for benefits under either program. The Social Security Administration has a strict definition of what qualifies as a disability, and only those who meet this definition will be eligible for benefits.

How do you apply for each type of benefit?

SSDI

There are two types of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits: primary and auxiliary. You can apply for both types of benefits at the same time.

To apply for primary SSDI benefits, you must:

  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Be a U.S. citizen or national
  • Have worked in a job covered by Social Security
  • Have a medical condition that meets the Social Security Administration’s definition of disability

To apply for auxiliary SSDI benefits, you must:

  • Be the spouse, child, or parent of a primary SSDI beneficiary
  • Meet the age, relationship, and citizenship requirements for each type of auxiliary benefit

If you are applying for SSDI benefits, you can do so online, by phone, or in person at your local Social Security office.

SSI

To apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or national
  • Have a low income and few assets
  • Have a medical condition that meets the Social Security Administration’s definition of a disability

If you are applying for SSI benefits, you can do so online, by phone, or in person at your local Social Security office.

Contact and visit us at 2H Law Firm.

No matter what your specific situation is, our experienced attorneys can help you navigate the Social Security Disability claims process. We have a long history of successfully representing clients in SSDI and SSI cases, and we’re here to help you get the benefits you deserve. Contact the expert attorneys 2H Law At (619) 374-9320 today for a free consultation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

H & H Workers' Comp & PI Law Firm

If you are unable to come to us, we’ll come to you. You can focus on healing and let us help you to get your deserved compensation.

Free Case Evaluation